BSPGHAN 2020 Plenary Awards

Sean Devane Prize- Best Gastroenterology Presentation

Oesophageal Mucosa Innervation in Paediatric Eosinophilic Oesophagitis

Kornilia Nikaki et al.

Introduction:

The mechanism for symptom generation in eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is not completely clear. Together with mechanical obstruction due to decreased oesophageal wall distensibility, oesophageal hypersensitivity has been noted. Hypersensitivity can be due to impairment of mucosal integrity and/or sensitization of mucosal nerves. The aim of our study was to delineate the mucosal innervation in the proximal and distal oesophagus in paediatric EoE and control subjects and correlate this with the histological findings.

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Alex Mowat Prize: Best Hepatology Presentation

Study of acute liver failure in children using targeted next generation sequencing technology

Robert Hegarty et al.

Introduction:
Acute liver failure (ALF) in children is rare but, without treatment, a potentially fatal condition. Whilst monogenic, metabolic diseases form the largest diagnostic category, diagnosis can be difficult such that in up to 43% of cases the cause remains undetermined.

Aim:
The study’s aim was to identify undiagnosed, monogenic causes of ALF using targeted, next generation sequencing (NGS) technology and report on its clinical utility. The primary objective was to identify undiagnosed monogenic diseases in children who received a diagnosis of indeterminate ALF and to describe their characteristics. The secondary objectives were to: (1) provide the research foundation to construct a diagnostic, genetic panel using targeted NGS technology for future children with indeterminate ALF; (2) identify and characterise children who have a mutation in NBAS (or any other novel gene).

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Best Poster Prize

Finger-lickin’ good? : An evaluation of a pilot intensive messy play programme for severe oral sensory sensitive children

Amanda Harvey et al.

Introduction:

Oral Sensory Sensitivity (OSS) leading to significant feeding issues is rare, but complex medical conditions and negative disease-based experiences can increase the risk. This can negatively impact on many areas including emotional and social development and growth. Severity can vary but use of feeding tubes may become necessary further exacerbating issues. Progress to a more normal intake can be slow and families are often frustrated with the impression of little or no progress over long periods of time. Our centre developed a short intensive intervention messy play course for children with significant OSS.

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Dr Falk IBD Poster Prize

Dietary triggers of colonic inflammation following treatment with exclusive enteral nutrition in children with Crohn’s disease

Konstantinos Gkikas et al.

Background:

Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) ameliorates gut inflammation in children with Crohn’s disease (CD). We have previously described the rapid rise in faecal calprotectin levels (FC) when children with CD return to their habitual diet after EEN treatment (1).

Aim:

We aimed to explore dietary triggers of CD relapse by performing dietary assessment and measuring biomarkers of food consumption in faeces of children with CD during early food reintroduction.

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Dr Falk Best IBD Poster

Infliximab Treatment Failure in Children with Crohn’s disease- is it avoidable?

Rulla al-Araji et al.

Background:

Infliximab is an effective treatment for patients with Crohn’s disease, however experience in adult IBD patients show treatment failure occurring in many patients in the first year of treatment.

Aim:

We aimed to identify proportion of children with Crohn’s disease failing Infliximab therapy in the first 12 months after treatment initiation with Infliximab. We have analysed the relationship between Infliximab levels, anti-Infliximab antibodies and non-response at week 14 and week 54.

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