BSPGHAN 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting

27- 29 April 2021

PROVISION OF BIOLOGICS IN SECONDARY CARE SETTING 5 YEARS ON: HOW ARE WE DOING? A SERVICE EVALUATION OF CURRENT COHORT INCLUDING PATIENT FEEDBACK

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Eleni Volonaki
Eleni Volonaki
5 months ago

You showed that your hospital has responded well in covering the needs of a number of patients in shared care with a tertiary centre. May I ask what the implications of your findings are? What are your future plans as a result of this service evaluation?

Angie Radford
Angie Radford
5 months ago

Thank you Eleni for your comment- we gathered very positive feedback from our families of children receiving biologics at our hospital- this was shared with the team. This feedback mainly boosted morale for staff involved and revealed the significant impact local treatment had on our families, some commenting the local treatment was ‘life changing’. It became apparent to me as a trainee how well our community nursing team and the Paediatric Consultant involved in those childrens’ care knew the families. Obviously a lot of trust was built over time, patients and families felt well informed, they knew when and where to escalate concerns, patients adhered to treatment and appointments and complied with provision of stool samples and monitoring bloods. All children were clinically well; we gathered good information on the profile of our small cohort.
They all appreciated being seen in joint IBD clinics with the tertiary consultant visiting on a three monthly basis. We tried to push families for improvements but families said that they couldn’t fault the service.
2 families receiving biologics at tertiary centre mentioned that communication between tertiary centre and local hospital was sometimes slow and needing improvement. I have taken this on board and fed this back to our tertiary clinicians; I have been trying to address this issue now that I am doing my SPIN module at the tertiary centre and am including secondary care physicians, who are often the referring clinicians, in correspondence after children were reviewed, underwent diagnostic procedures or were diagnosed at tertiary centre.
I also learned that not all distric general hospitals in the Thames Valley area are offering a similar service and we will explore whether a similar service could be expanded in the region; this will depend on locally available resources and commitment from physicians with special interest in gastroenterology.

Jutta Koeglmeier
Jutta Koeglmeier
5 months ago

you are presenting your experience of prescribing biologicals to children with IBD in a secondary care setting providing shared care with a tertiary IBD centre. Could you please comment how patients were chose to have biological therapy in your unit (12 children fulfilled the inclusion criteria but only 9 received biological therapy at your unit)

Angie Radford
Angie Radford
5 months ago

Thanks Jutta- At MKUH we can provide Adalimumab given as injections at home and infliximab infusions on our day ward- 9 children received these treatments; the 3 other children received either vedolizumab or ustekinumab which is currently administered at the tertiary centre only.

sue protheroe
sue protheroe
5 months ago

Great poster. Always good to hear families feedback.
thank you